Why neighborhoods (and how we study them) matter for adolescent development

Adolescence is a sensitive developmental period marked by significant changes that unfold across multiple contexts. As a central context of development, neighborhoods capture—in both physical and social space—the stratification of life chances and differential distribution of resources and risks. For some youth, neighborhoods are springboards to opportunities; for others, they are snares that constrain progress and limit the ability to avoid risks. Despite abundant research on “neighborhood effects,” scant attention has been paid to how neighborhoods are a product of social stratification forces that operate simultaneously to affect human development.

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Some things I have learned about aging by studying the life course

Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2017 Authors Settersten, RA Journal Innovation in Aging Volume 1 Issue 2 Date Published Sept-01-2017 Abstract “Aging” and the “life course” are distinct but complementary phenomena that inform one another. Building on this insight, this essay conveys some lessons the author has learned about aging by studying the … Continue reading Some things I have learned about aging by studying the life course

Precisely where are we going? Charting the new terrain of precision prevention

Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2017 Authors Meagher, KM, McGowan, ML, Settersten, RA, Fishman, JR, Juengst, ET Journal Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics Volume 18 Issue 1 Pagination 369 - 387 Date Published Apr-24-2017 ISSN 1527-8204 Abstract In addition to genetic data, precision medicine research gathers information about three factors that … Continue reading Precisely where are we going? Charting the new terrain of precision prevention

“Let’s pull these technologies out of the ivory tower”: The politics, ethos, and ironies of participant-driven genomic research

Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2017 Authors McGowan, ML, Choudhury, S, Juengst, ET, Lambrix, M, Settersten, RA, Fishman, JR Journal BioSocieties Issue 3 Date Published Mar-22-2017 ISSN 1745-8552 Abstract This paper investigates how groups of ‘citizen scientists’ in non-traditional settings and primarily online networks claim to be challenging conventional genomic research processes and norms. … Continue reading “Let’s pull these technologies out of the ivory tower”: The politics, ethos, and ironies of participant-driven genomic research

Responses to financial loss during the Great Recession: An examination of sense of control in late midlife.

Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2016 Authors Mejía, ST, Settersten, RA, Odden, MC, Hooker, K Journal J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci Volume 71 Issue 4 Pagination 734-44 Date Published 2016 Jul ISSN 1758-5368 Abstract OBJECTIVES: The "Great Recession" shocked the primary institutions that help individuals and families meet their needs and … Continue reading Responses to financial loss during the Great Recession: An examination of sense of control in late midlife.

From “personalized” to “precision” medicine: The ethical and social implications of rhetorical reform in genomic medicine

Since the late 1980s, the human genetics and genomics research community has been promising to usher in a “new paradigm for health care”—one that uses molecular profiling to identify human genetic variants implicated in multifactorial health risks. After the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, a wide range of stakeholders became committed to this “paradigm shift,” creating a confluence of investment, advocacy, and enthusiasm that bears all the marks of a “scientific/intellectual social movement” within biomedicine.

Aging: It’s interpersonal! Reflections from two life course migrants

We start with the observation that aging gerontologists often engage in two distinct discourses on aging—one public and one private. This separation entails “othering,” which reproduces agism and stigma. Based on personal experience, insight from colleagues and writers, and concepts from symbolic interaction perspectives, we argue that becoming old to some degree involves becoming a stranger. Before reaching old age, both of us have been in the position of strangers due to social experiences that left us “off the line” or “on the margins.” Examples are crossing social borders related to nations, class structures, gender, race, health status, and generations.

Citizen science or scientific citizenship? Disentangling the uses of public engagement rhetoric in national research initiatives

The language of “participant-driven research,” “crowdsourcing” and “citizen science” is increasingly being used to encourage the public to become involved in research ventures as both subjects and scientists. Originally, these labels were invoked by volunteer research efforts propelled by amateurs outside of traditional research institutions and aimed at appealing to those looking for more “democratic,” “patient-centric,” or “lay” alternatives to the professional science establishment.

Normative climates of parenthood across Europe: Judging voluntary childlessness and working parents

Past research on gender role attitudes has often focused on individual- rather than country-level explanations. Drawing on European Social Survey data from 21 countries, we examine the effect of societal normative climates (i.e., shared perceptions of others’ attitudes) on personal attitudes towards two non-traditional gender roles: Voluntary childlessness and working full-time while children are young. To detect potential gender differences, we analyse disapproval of men and women separately.